THE LINDBERGH KIDNAPPING: The Mystery of “Cemetery John”.

Who Was John Knowles?

The confession of Gene Zorn, the author’s father, concerning a Conversation he overheard in Palisades Park, N.J., in which a neighbor,  John Knoll, said the words Bruno and Englewood led the author to investigate John Knoll and write this book.

RESOURCES USED BY ROBERT ZORN

  • Prosecutors

  • FBI profilers

  • Geographic profilers

  • Forensic psychiatrists

  • Forensic anthropologists

  • Personality disorder researchers

  • Experts in optical handwriting analysis

  • Forensic linguistics

  • Child abduction analysts

  • Pediatric head trauma experts

EVIDENCE REVISITED

  • Photos and sketches

  • Handwriting samples

  • The ladder

  • Footprints and other impressions

Investigative techniques on existing evidence not available in 1932

CONCLUSIONS

The confession of Gene Zorn, the author’s father, concerning a Conversation he overheard in Palisades Park in which a neighbor,  John Knoll, said the words Bruno and Englewood led the author to investigate John Knoll. His findings are as follows:

John Condon, the go-between who delivered the ransom money, failed to recognize the available sketch of Cemetery John as Bruno Hauptmann.

The sketch bears an uncanny resemblance to John Knoll.

Knoll lied that he was in the country at the time of the kidnapping and left the country in 1932, before the trial.

Knoll’s activities indicate that he fits the FBI profile of a sociopath and psychopath.

 

OTHER EVIDENCE THAT JUST DOES NOT ADD UP: 

Shooting down the single shooter theory? Hauptmann was definitely involved as proven by the evidence in his home of the ladder, connections to John Condon, and his possession of the ransom money. BUT, did he do it alone? Was he the mastermind?

  • Problems with the ladder. No single person could handle it.
  • Hauptmann’s car was not capable of transporting the ladder in a single trip.
  • The Ransom Money. Where was the missing money?
  • John Condon’s recognition of the go-between’s voice.
  • Two sets of footprints at the crime scene.
  • Hauptmann’s IQ for such a plot was questionable.

 

 

 

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